unspecified-3 Kopie

February has been quite an eventful month for Vienna’s art scene: besides a number of exhibition openings, it also got to celebrate the inauguration of two new venues. Fanny Hauser has all the details.

 

Lutz Bacher, More Than This Exhibition View, Secession 2016 Photo: Oliver Ottenschläger

Lutz Bacher, More Than This
Exhibition View, Secession 2016
Photo: Oliver Ottenschläger

Vienna’s Secession will be hosting a solo showing dedicated to American artists Lutz Bacher and Dike Blair until April 3rd. Dike Blair has been dedicated to contemporary forms of landscape depiction and still life since the early 1980s, while American artist Lutz Bacher (who started her career under her male pseudonym) created her works using images and objects anchored in collective memory.

Besides Anuk Miladinovic’s solo showing at das weisse haus, you can admire the works of Austrian artist Maria Anwander. Her works focus on the role of artists within the art system. Anwander also examines the subject of the creative block and reflects on our society’s expectations toward the artist.

A current exhibition at the Lisabird Contemporary Gallery displays works by Zurich-born artist Patric Sandri. Sandri, whose works remind us of artists like Ad Reinhardt and Robert Rauschenberg, plays with his medium’s materiality. As far as style and content are concerned, through his reductionism Sandri approaches an asymptotic process of a form of pure art. The exhibition runs through March 19th.

Anuk Miladinović, Sollbruchstelle, Videostill, 2015 Courtesy: das weisse haus

Anuk Miladinović, Sollbruchstelle, Videostill, 2015
Courtesy: das weisse haus

Patric Sandri, Untitled (to) Installation view at LisaBird Contemporary, Vienna, 2016 Courtesy: The Artist and LisaBird Contemporary

Patric Sandri, Untitled (to)
Installation view at LisaBird Contemporary, Vienna, 2016
Courtesy: The Artist and LisaBird Contemporary

The showing ELSEWHERE: Observations on Islands (2015) had examined “insularity” as a paradigm for openness, plurality, and a relational idea of a “somewhere else”. NOW/HERE at FRANZ JOSEFS KAI 3 now follows up with a group showing, starring works by Andy Boot, Raphael Hefti, Alicja Kwade, Lisa Oppenheim, and Iris Touliatou, among others. Their multilayered, aesthetically woven case study deals with the concept of the ephemeral.

In closing we also need to mention that this February, Vienna’s art scene will be inaugurating two new venues. Nathalie Halgand Gallery in the 6th district opens at the end of the month with a solo showing dedicated to German artist Clemens Behr. The focus of Behr’s mostly space-oriented works (that are displayed in both the inside and outside areas) rests on the principle of collage and the spacial development of its assemblage.

The show room Kevin Space at Brunnenmarkt in the 16th district opens its doors on February 23rd with a solo showing dedicated to British artist Caspar Heinemann. An activist by background and with origins in the DIY punk-culture, Heinemann now dedicates his/her artistic practice to critical mysticism, counterculturalmythology, and queer biosemiotics. The opening includes a performance that Heinemann conceived during his/her Viennese Artist-in-Residency.

Exhibition View  Clemens Behr "Erst die gute Nachricht bitte", 2016 Galerie Nathalie Halgand, Vienna Courtesy: Galerie Nathalie Halgand Photo: Julian Mullan

Exhibition View
Clemens Behr “Erst die gute Nachricht bitte”, 2016
Galerie Nathalie Halgand, Vienna
Courtesy: Galerie Nathalie Halgand
Photo: Julian Mullan

Exhibition View NOW/HERE, Franz Josefs Kai 3, 2016 © Björn Segschneider

Exhibition View
NOW/HERE, Franz Josefs Kai 3, 2016
© Björn Segschneider

Caspar Heinemann, Alter (Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels), 2014, Courtesy the artist

Caspar Heinemann, Alter (Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels), 2014
Courtesy the artist

// Fanny Hauser

Leave a Comment