1_The-Promise-of-Total-Automation

After an exciting start of the year, the Viennese galleries, museums and other exhibition spaces have prepared a promising exhibition programme. We will provide you with an overview.

 

ECRIVAIN PUBLIC Irena Eden & Stijn Lernout, Ecrivain Public, announcement board, 2014, Douz, Tunisia © Photo: Irena Eden & Stijn Lernout

ECRIVAIN PUBLIC
Irena Eden & Stijn Lernout, Ecrivain Public, announcement board, 2014, Douz, Tunisia
© Photo: Irena Eden & Stijn Lernout

The exhibition space Kunstraum Niederösterreich currently hosts THE TURN المنعرج. This group show focuses on the Arab Spring which started five years ago in Tunisia. It has since led to radical changes and awakenings with far reaching consequences not only in the Arab world. THE TURN features interventions in both urban and rural settings of the post-revolutionary Tunisia. They are united by a profound interest in socio-political themes and a direct social engagement, which stands in the tradition of the „Social Turn“ (Claire Bishop) in modern art history. On view are, among others, works by Omar Abusaada, Irena Eden, Moufida Fedhila, Reem Gibriel, Inkman, Johanna Kandl, Halim Karabibene, Huda Lutfi, Selma Ouissi, Sofiane Ouissi, Hamdy Reda and transparadiso.

After its opening with a performance by Swiss artist Florence Jung in late March, Kunsthalle3000 now starts its “second round”. Temporarily located in Alois Drasche Park, in Vienna’s forth municipal district, Kunsthalle3000 aims to transform the unused potential of the public space, thereby creating opportunities for a direct interaction with the public. The current showing has been curated by Parisian curator Sophie Lapalu and presents artist and taxi driver Jeffrey Perkins, who spent twenty years driving cabs in New York City and who has recorded his conversations with passengers over a 10-year period.

Andreas Huber currently presents the works of Portuguese artist Hugo Canoilas. On the occasion of his first solo exhibition, the artist presents not only large-format paintings, but also site-specific floor installations, in which the floor is covered with dirty yellow paint and creates a stark contrast to the vertically presented paintings. The show has been extended until April 30th.

HUGO CANOILAS The black mass for hipsters club - 2016, silicone and paint on found objects, 70 x 700 x 1.300 cm Photo: Stefan Lux

HUGO CANOILAS
The black mass for hipsters club – 2016, silicone and paint on found objects, 70 x 700 x 1.300 cm
Photo: Stefan Lux

Exhibition View: The Promise of Total Automation, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna 2016 Photo: Stephan Wyckoff

Exhibition View: The Promise of Total Automation, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna 2016
Photo: Stephan Wyckoff

Kunsthalle Wien‘s current exhibition features various artists’ views on the relationship between art and complete automation. “The Promise of Total Automation” showcases the social and political effects of automation since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution all the way into a digital future. Over thirty artistic perspectives contemplate the relationships with technical objects and reflect on the changes brought into our life and work environments by automation and digitalization. On show are, among others, works by Harry Dodge, Cécile B. Evans, Judith Fegerl, Melanie Gilligan, Channa Horwitz, Geumhyung Jeong, David Jourdan, Barbara Kapusta, Nick Laessing, Mark Leckey, Benoît Maire, Régis Mayot, Wesley Meuris, Henrik Olesen and Julien Prévieux.

SWDZ – So Weit die Zukunft – German abbreviation for „So far, the future“ – presents French artist Laurent Bompard’s digital collages. His works combine the typical elements of architectural representation, such as photographs, drawings, models, and signs in a new way, thereby creating an impossible city: elements of modernism, Bauhaus, brutalism, and post-modernism are transformed and elevated. Urban infrastructure and buildings turn into an absurd, comical chaos that makes us think. Chaos is this show’s leitmotif, and the reason why its title is „Chaopolis“.

// Fanny Hauser

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